Additionality in Low Impact Hydro

Ali Shajrawi, Liam Brooks, Jonathan Burnston Market Research Briefs

The desire to provide “Additionality” has been a major driver of new corporate demand for renewable energy procurement in recent years. Citing several Low Impact Hydro Institute (LIHI) Certified projects as reference cases, Karbone has constructed this research piece to illustrate the types of opportunity available to Corporate purchasers who are seeking to have a greater impact on the status quo and who are not limited to “New-Build-Only” Additionality.

U.S. Renewable Energy Monthly Policy Round-up

Ali Shajrawi, Liam Brooks Market Research Briefs

The following report provides a monthly summary of proposed and recently enacted legislative and regulatory policy affecting the renewable energy markets in the United States. It also serves as the first iteration of a Karbone renewable energy policy commentary series. The series will be updated regularly on a monthly basis.

Decoding the MA SREC-II Forward Outlook: Compliance Year 2018 in Focus

Ali Shajrawi, Liam Brooks Market Research Briefs

Last week, the Senate introduced a revised version of HB114, maintaining the RPS mandate but reducing the non-solar requirement to 8.5% and solar requirement to 0.34% by 2022, and keeping it as such before ending the program entirely in 2027. HB114 also loosens the siting requirements for wind projects, seeking to invite investors back to developing in OH.

Mixed Renewable Policy Package: Connecticut Legislators Agree on SB 9

Ali Shajrawi, Liam Brooks Market Research Briefs

On May 8th, the Connecticut Senate approved SB 9, seeking to restructure the state’s renewable energy program. The bill includes a boost to the RPS market, an extension of the ZREC program and changes to the net-metering policy in the state. Karbone will further detail the impact of this bill on the broader NEPOOL Class I REC market in an upcoming research report.

The Clean Energy Standard

Ali Shajrawi, Liam Brooks Market Research Briefs

On August 11, 2017, Massachusetts regulators filed the proposed final version of CMR 7.75, the Clean Energy Standard (CES), a plan to cut state GHG emissions by 80% of their 1990 levels by 2050. To achieve this aggressive target, the state is going to rely on the procurement of long-term contracts to import hydropower from Canada, as well as the development of more renewable resources, such as wind and solar. Ultimately, however, whether this new mandate can achieve its compliance targets is going to require not only committed project development capital, but also large investments in new transmission lines.

SMART-er Solar Market in Massachusetts?

Ali Shajrawi, Liam Brooks Market Research Briefs

On August 11, 2017, the Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources (DOER) filed a much anticipated final version of the Solar Massachusetts Renewable Target (SMART) Program regulation. This revised SMART framework proposition includes several components that market participants heavily discussed during three public hearings as critical to the success of this program and its objectives.

NEPOOL Rounding Third (Quarter)

Ali Shajrawi Market Research Briefs

There has been continued year-on-year supply growth in the NEPOOL Class I REC market across all states and almost all technologies. The following report explores the resulting supply and demand fundamentals and analyzes the pricing trends and legislative impact on this particular market.

MA SREC II Market – the Tale of Two Caps

Ali Shajrawi Market Research Briefs

Over the past year, the Massachusetts SREC-II program has been facing significant programmatic risks as both the net metering and the solar carve-out caps were quickly reached. In April, Massachusetts lawmakers finally passed net metering reform that increased the private and the public caps by 3%, allowing the build of a large number of commercial solar projects that had accumulated on the waiting list for months. In the same month, the Department of Energy Resources (DOER) filed an emergency regulation after receiving a quantity of SREC-II applications in-excess of the available remaining capacity under the SREC-II program cap. The emergency regulations contained several key provisions that aimed to address market uncertainty and establishing a smooth transition to the next incentive program beyond SREC-II.